SANTISSIMO NOME DI GESU (MOST HOLY NAME OF JESUS)

Rome's first Jesuit church and
burial of the founder of the Jesuit Order, St. Ignatius Loyola
The church of the Gesu in central Rome was built between 1568 and 1584, consistent with plans
drawn up by Vignola. It was Rome's first Jesuit church. Its early baroque facade was later imitated.

In Rim of Christendom (pages 515 to 517, "Patron of the Art") Bolton discusses that
Father Eusebio
Francisco Kino
gave advice on the statues for the Gesu remodel and sent money for decoration.
Only one of the four statues which Kino wanted included in the design found a place there (see
below). There is no evidence Kino ever visited this church.
Above the chapel's alter is a painting of the
saint, framed by gilded lapis lazuli columns.
The founder of the Jesuit Order, St. Ignatius Loyola, lies buried in the grand
Cappella di Sant' Ignazio Loyola which was built by Andrea del Pozzo in 1696.
A century after completion, the church was decorated with a swirling ceiling fresco by
Baciccia and stucco work by Antonio Raggi.
Religion Overthrowing Heresy and Hatred, by Pierre Legros the Younger
(1695–1699). Marble, H. 3 m (9 ft. 10 in.). Church of the Gesù, Rome, Italy.
Father Kino sent money to Rome for the continued decoration of this church. Only one of the
statues he requested was actually included. Below are photographs of this statue. In the right
image you can see that it is located to the right of the lapis columns of the Cappella di Sant'
Ignazio Loyola built in 1696.
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